February 17, 2017

The weird love for writing - by Rohadi


“What do you love about writing?” This month’s writing prompt.

I had to think about this, and then think about it again, then think about it some more. But every time I tried to think about my ‘love’ for writing all that came up was how writing was/is work. Work that beckons me to participate most days. Work that I couldn’t live without, but work that requires constant struggle through resistance to complete. 

I don't always like my work.

Not only is writing work, but it’s also a part of me. I can't get away. It’s how I get my ideas out, and I don’t really have a choice in the matter. I either write something or become a discombobulated mess as ideas amass themselves in the limited space between my ears. 

Ah, the 'joys' of writing….

But then it dawns on me. If writing was an instant success where every word came naturally and perfectly, what would the point be? What kind of love measures itself on whimsy and ease? A love that’s fleeting, that’s what.

Most of us would know that the quality of love is rooted in its substantive essence. The choosing you have to do day, by day, by day, to love. This is why even on those days you don’t like to write, you still love writing. Then one day, sometimes by chance or miracle, the love offering of words produces the reward—the book, the perfect sonnet, beautiful paragraphs…. 

It's why we keep returning, we choose to love writing. An odd kind of love, no doubt, since I may need writing, but writing doesn’t need me. 

_________

Connect with Rohadi on his website, and check out his adult colouring book.

9 comments:

  1. I like these lines of yours:

    "I either write something or become a discombobulated mess..."

    "Then one day...the love offering of words produces the reward—the book, the perfect sonnet, beautiful paragraphs…."

    "I may need writing, but writing doesn’t need me."

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  2. Love of any kind is always challenging. Our love of writing is definitely going to be demanding if we're determined to make it work. But our passion and our devotion will be greatly rewarded if we persevere.

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  3. Totally relate, Rohadi. I hadn't looked at it from this view before, but you make good sense to me.

    It's like asking someone, "What do you love about raising children? Volunteering? Starting a business? Exercise?" Writing is bigger than loving ice cream, or a TV show. There's so much invested in the motivation, in the process, and the outcome is often unpredictable. But yes, for me it's a need as well. Thx for putting this on my radar!

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    1. Without a substantive love for writing you're not going far....

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  4. I, too, had many favourite lines from this post: "What kind of love measures itself on whimsy and ease? A love that’s fleeting, that’s what... the quality of love is rooted in its substantive essence. The choosing you have to do day, by day, by day, to love." You've really distilled it down to its core, Rohadi. You've gotten to the 'heart' of the matter!

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  5. I found myself smiling as I read your blog. Smiling? Yes, smiling, because of your apt expressions that readers have already mentioned. I am also smiling, because your thoughts parallel what people say about marriage. We choose each day to love our spouses, even on days when the rubber hits rough spots or the red light for low oil comes on.

    For married folk, it's good to ask in the morning, "What could I do today to make my husband's/wife's day better?" For writing, we can ask, "What one thing could I do to make my writing better?"

    Still smiling, as I enjoyed reading your blog, Rohadi. Thanks.

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  6. Thanks for the thought. :)

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  7. Such a thoughtful blog, Rohadi. Sometimes we have to think about this, and then think about it again, then think about it some more" before we find our answers. What impacted me too was that joy is a choice, not just some haphazard feeling. Well done!

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